Bears Ears Bibliography

Bears Ears Bibliography

In this space I am going to attempt to collect as many publications relating to Bears Ears National Monument and the surrounding region as I can. I will include (and start with) the bibliography I compiled for the White House when they were examining the Bears Ears proposals. These will be marked with a * to indicate their inclusion in the supporting documents. I have removed "in review" or "in press" citations here to make things easier to find; several were included in the White House bibliography and will be cited here once they are formally published. I think this is important because administration officials repeatedly asked me to provide references to why paleo at Bears Ears is important. With this, now you can see too (and see how it grows in the coming years).

Additionally I have tried to break up the bibliography by time period, to make finding certain things easier. That does mean a couple publications are duplicated as they cross periods (from the Pennyslvianian to the Permian, for example). I have also tried to note which references are directly within the final boundaries of BENM with a + as opposed to those that are referencing the larger region. As a future goal for this bibliography, I will note in some manner which references are have a primary focus on BENM and which only mention work there tangentially, probably with a "-" to signify only passing reference. Some of the titles will make that obvious anyway but I feel it can still be useful overall. I am also debating adding a special designation for papers that are within Red Canyon as that area was the focus of much back and forth between the administration and the various advocacy groups.

This page will contninually grow as new posters, abstracts, and papers are added. New additions will be noted here with the date added. I am hopeful that all the papers, abstracts, preprints, and posters will eventually be hotlinked here. Currently I have hotlinked all the online resources through the Permian, with scattered younger references as well. The list is primarily the paleontological references; geological references will be added under the geology section at some point as well.

Comments, additions, etc. are always welcomed!

Latest Changes:

2/15/17: Updated Gay et al. (2016a) to Gay et al (2017a) to reflect the updated nature of the preprint. Added Hunt-Foster et al. (2016), Lucas (1898), Lockley and Hunt (1995), and Hunt and Lucas (2007) to the Late Triassic. Added link to Gay et al. (2017b).
1/26/17: Added Milner and Lockley (2016) to the Late Triassic.
1/4/17: Added Gay et al. (2016b) to the Late Triassic.
1/3/17: Uploaded bibliography, added Smith et al., (2016), Gay et al. (2016a), Gay et al (2017), to the Late Triassic; Milan et al., (2015) to the Early Cretaceous.

Late Pennsylvanian


*+DiMichele, W. A., & Hook, R. W. (1992). Paleozoic terrestrial ecosystems. In A. K. Behrensmeyer, J. D. Damuth, W. A. DiMichele, R. Potts, H.-D. Sues, & S. L. Wing (Eds.), Terrestrial Ecosystems Through Time (pp. 205-325). Chicago: Univerity of Chicago Press.
*+DiMichele, W. A., Cecil, C. B., Chaney, D. S., Elrick, S. D., & Nelson, W. J. (2011). Fossil floras from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Cutler Group of southeastern UtahUtah Geological Association Publication, 43, 491-504.
*Franczyk, K. J., Clark, G., Brew, D. C., & Pitman, J. K. (1995). Chart showing lithology, mineralogy, and paleontology of the Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group at Hermosa Mountain, La Plata County, ColoradoMiscellaneous Investigations, 2555.
*+Hasiotis, S. T., Rasmussen, D. L., Rasmussen, G. L., & Rasmussen, L. (2010). Bivalve burrows and associated trace fossils in the Upper Pennsylvanian (Virgilian) Halgatio Formation near Mexican Hat, Utah. Geological Society of America Abstract with Programs (p. 1). Geological Society of America.
*+Loope, D. B. (1994). Borings in an oomoldic rockground, Pennsylvanian of southeast Utah. Palaios, 9(3), 299-306.
*Melton, R. A. (1972). Paleoecology and paleoenvironment of the upper Honaker Trail Formation near Moab, Utah. Brigham Young University Research Studies, Geology Series, 19(2), 45-88.
*+Pray, L. C., & Wray, J. L. (1963). Porous Algal Facies (Pennsylvanian) Honaker Trail, San Juan Canyon, Utah. Shelf Carbonates of the Paradox Basin, Fourth Field Conference (pp. 204-234). Four Corners Geological Society.
*+Rigby, J. K., & Stokes, W. L. (1971). Haplistion sphaericum Finks, a rhizomorine sponge, from the Pennsylvanian of southeastern Utah. Journal of Paleontology, 45(3), 553-554.
*Ritter, S. M., Barrick, J. E., & Skinner, M. R. (2002). Conodont sequence biostratigraphy of the Hermosa Group (Pennsylvanian) at Honaker Trail, Paradox Basin, UtahJournal of Paleontology, 76(3), 495-517.
*Rueger, B. F. (1996). Palynology and its relationship to climatically induced depositional cycles in the Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation of southeastern Utah. USGS Bulletin, 2000-K.
*Sanderson, G. A., & Verville, G. J. (1990). Fusulinid zonation of the General Petroleum No. 45-5-G core, Emery County, Utah. The Mountain Geologist, 27(4), 131-136.
*+Scott, K. M., & Sumida, S. (2004). Permo-Carboniferous vertebrate fossils from the Halgaito Shale, Cutler Group, southeastern Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs (p. 230). Geological Society of America.
*+Sumida, S. S., Albright, G. M., & Rega, E. A. (1999). Late Paleozoic fishes in Utah. In D. D. Gillette (Ed.), Vertebrate paleontology in Utah (Vols. 99-1, pp. 13-20). Salt Lake City: Utah Geological Survey.
*+Sumida, S. S., Lombard, R. E., Berman, D. S., & Henrici, A. C. (1999). Late Paleozoic Amniotes and Their Near Relatives from Utah and Northeastern Arizona, With Comments on the Permian-Pennsylvanian Boundary in Utah and Northern Arizona. In D. Gillette (Ed.), Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah (Vol. 99, pp. 31-43). Utah: Utah Geological Survey.
*+Sumida, S. S., Walliser, J. B., & Lombard, R. E. (1999). Late Paleozoic amphibian-grade tetrapods of Utah. In D. D. Gillette (Ed.), Vertebrate paleontology in Utah (Vols. 99-1, pp. 21-30). Salt Lake City: Utah Geological Survey
*Tidwell, W. D., Thayn, G., & Terrell, F. (1972). New Upper Pennsylvanian fossil plant locality from the Honaker Trail Formation near Moab, Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 4, p. 417. Geological Society of America.
*+Wengerd, S. A. (1951). Reef Limestones of Hermosa Formation, San Juan Canyon, Utah. AAPG Bulletin, 35(5), 1038-1051.
*+Wengerd, S. A. (1955). Biohermal Trends in Pennsylvanian Strata of San Juan Canyon, Utah. Geology of Parts of Paradox, Black Mesa and San Juan Basins, Four Corners Field Conference (pp. 70-77). Four Corners Geological Society.
*Williams, J. S. (1949). Paleontology of the Leadville, Hermosa, and Rico formations. In E. B. Eckel (Ed.), Geology and ore deposits of the La Plata District, Colorado (pp. 17-24). Reston: United States Geological Survey.

Early Permian

*Berman, D. S., Reisz, R. R., & Fracasso, M. A. (1981). Skull of the Lower Permian dissorophid amphibian (Platyhystrix rugosus). Annals of the Carnegie Museum, 50, 391-416.
*+Branson, E. B., & Mehl, M. G. (1928). Auditory Organs of Some Labyrinthodonts. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 39.2, 485-489.
*+DiMichele, W. A., & Hook, R. W. (1992). Paleozoic terrestrial ecosystems. In A. K. Behrensmeyer, J. D. Damuth, W. A. DiMichele, R. Potts, H.-D. Sues, & S. L. Wing (Eds.), Terrestrial Ecosystems Through Time (pp. 205-325). Chicago: Univerity of Chicago Press.
*+DiMichele, W. A., Cecil, C. B., Chaney, D. S., Elrick, S. D., & Nelson, W. J. (2011). Fossil floras from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Cutler Group of southeastern UtahUtah Geological Association Publication, 43, 491-504.
*DiMichele, W. A., Charney, D. S., Nelson, W. J., Lucas, S. G., Looy, C. V., Quick, K., & Wang, J. (2007). A low diversity, season tropical landscape dominated by conifers and peltasperms: Early Permian Abo Formation, New MexicoReview of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 145, 249-273.
*DiMichele, W. A., Tabor, N. J., Chaney, D. S., & Nelson, W. J. (2006). From wetlands to wet spots: environmental tracking and the fate of Carboniferous elements in Early Permian tropical floras. In Wetlands through Time (pp. 223-248). Reston: United States Geological Survey.
*+Dzenowski, N., Hasiotis, S. T., & Rasmussen, D. L. (2013). Vertebrate burrows within pedogenically modified deposits from the Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) Cedar Mesa Sandstone of southeastern Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 45, p. 3226. Denver: Geological Society of America.
*+Hasiotis, S. T., & Rasmussen, D. L. (2010). Enigmatic, large- and mega-diameter burrows in the Lower Permian Cedar Mountain Sandstone, Comb Ridge and the Moqui Dugway, southeastern Utah. Geological Society of America Rocky Mountain Section Abstracts with Programs. 42, p. 2. Geological Society of America.
*Lockley, M. G., & Madsen, J. (1993). Early Permian vertebrate trackways from the Cedar Mesa Sandstone of eastern Utah: evidence of predator-prey interaction. Ichnos, 2(2), 147-153.
*+Lucas, S. G. (2006). Global Permian tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology. In Geological Society of London Special Publications 265 (pp. 65-93).
*Mamay, S. H., & Breed, W. J. (1970). Early Permian plants from the Cutler Formation in Monument Valley, Utah. Department of the Interior. United States Geological Survey.
*Montanez, I. P., Tabor, N. J., Niemeier, D., DiMichele, W. A., Frank, T. D., Fielding, C. R., . . . Rygel, M. C. (2007). CO2-forced climate change and vegetation instability during the Late Paleozoic deglaciation. Science, 315, 87-91
*+Scott, K. M., & Sumida, S. (2004). Permo-Carboniferous vertebrate fossils from the Halgaito Shale, Cutler Group, southeastern Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs (p. 230). Geological Society of America.
*+Vaughn, P. P. (1962). Vertebrates from the Halgaito Tongue of the Cutler Formation, Permian of San Juan County, Utah. Journal of Paleontology, 36(3), 529-539.
*+Vaughn, P. P. (1964). Vertebrates from the Organ Rock Shale of the Cutler Group, Permian of Monument Valley and vicinity, Utah and Arizona. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 38(3), 567-583.
*+Vaughn, P. P. (1966). Seymouria from the Lower Permian of southeastern Utah, and possible sexual dimorphism in that genus. Journal of Paleontology, 40(3), 603-612.
*+Vaughn, P. P. (1967). Evidence of ossified vertebrae in actinopterygian fish of Early Permian age, from southeastern Utah. Journal of Paleontology, 41(1), 151-160.
*+Vaughn, P. P. (1973). Vertebrates from the Cutler Group of Monument Valley and vicinity. Guidebook of the Monument Valley and Vicinity, Arizona and Utah (pp. 99-105). Socorro: New Mexico Geological Society.

Middle Triassic

*Fraiser, M. L., & Bottjer, D. J. (2000). The u-shaped trace fossil Arenicolites: burrow of an opportunist during the biotic recovery from the end-Permian mass extinction. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 32, pp. A-368. Geological Society of America.
*+Welles, S. P. (1967). Arizona's giant amphibians. Pacific Discovery, 10, 10-15.

Late Triassic

*+Ash, S. R. (1975). The Chinle (Upper Triassic) flora of southeastern Utah. Four Corners Geological Society Guidebook, 8th Field Conference, Canyonlands. Canyonlands.

*+Ash, S. R. (1994). First occurrence of Czekanowskia (Gymnospermae, Czekanowskiales) in the United States. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 81, 129-140.

*Ash, S. R. (2001). New cycadophytes from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of the southwestern United States. PaleoBios, 21(1), 15-28.

*+Branson, E. B., & Mehl, M. G. (1929). Triassic amphibians from the Rocky Mountain Region. The University of Missouri Studies, 4, 1-87.

*+Colbert, E. H. (1972). Vertebrates from the Chinle formation. In Investigations in the Triassic Chinle Formation (pp. 1-11). Flagstaff: Museum of Northern Arizona Press.

*+Conrad, K. L., & Lockley, M. G. (1986). Late Triassic archosaur tracksites from the American southwest. First International Symposium on Dinosaur Tracks and Traces, Abstracts with Program.

*+Fraser, N. C., & Irmis, R. B. (13A). A procolophonid (Parareptilia) from the Owl Rock Member, Chinle Formation of Utah, USA. Palaeontologia Electronica, 8(1), 2005.


+Gay, R. J., Jenkins, X. A., & Lepore, T. (2017a) The oldest vertebrate trace fossils from Comb Ridge (Bears Ears region, southeastern Utah). PeerJ Preprints 4:e2662v1

+Gay, R. J., Jenkins X., St. Aude, I., & Azouggagh, D. (2016). "A new, diverse microvertebrate locality from the Lower Chinle Formation of southeastern Utah (USA)" Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts, 2016. Page 143

+Gay, R. J., Jenkins, X. A., Milner, A. R. C., Van Vranken, N. E., Dewitt, D. M., & Lepore, T. (2017b). A newTriassic bonebed from the Bears Ears Region of UtahWestern Association of Vertebrate Paleontologists, Annual Meeting Abstracts.

*Gibson, S. Z. (2013). A new hump-backed ginglymodian fish (Neopterygii, Semionotiformes) from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of southeastern Utah. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33, p. 1037–1050.

+Hunt, A.P. & Lucas, S.G. (2007). Late Triassic tetrapod tracks of western North America. In S. G. Lucas & J. A. Spielmann (Eds.), Triassic of the American West (Vol. 40, p. 215-230). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.
+Hunt-Foster, R.K., Lockley, M.G., Milner, A.R.C., Foster, J.R., Matthews, N.A., Breithaupt, B.H., & Smith, J.A. (2016) Tracking dinosaurs in BLM Canyon Country, Utah. in Geology of the Intermountain West, vol. 3., Sprinkel et al., eds.
*Irmis, R. B., Chure, D. J., & Wiersma, J. P. (2015). Latitudinal gradients in Late Triassic nonmarine ecosystems: new insights from the Upper Chinle Formation of northeastern Utah. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts (p. 149). Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

+Lockley, M.G. & Hunt, A.P. (1995). Dinosaur tracks and other fossil footprints from the western United States. New York, Columbia University Press. pp. 338
*+Long, R. A., & Murry, P. A. (1995). Late Triassic (Carnian and Norian) tetrapods from the southwestern United States (Vol. 4). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

*+Lopez, A., St. Aude, I., Alderete, D., Alvarez, D., Aultman, H., Busch, D., . . . Gay, R. J. (2015). An unusual archosauriform tooth increases known tetrapod diversity in the lower portion of the Chinle Formation (Late Triassic) of southeastern Utah, USAPeerJ PrePrints, 3(e1828).
Lucas, F.A. (1898) A new Crocodile from the trias of southern Utah. The American Journal of Science. (4), 6, p. 399-400.

*+Lucas, S. G. (1997). Stratigraphy of the Upper Triassic Chinle Group, Four Corners region. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook48, p. 81-107. Albuquerque.

*Lucas, S. G., & Hunt, A. P. (1987). The Triassic system in the Dry Cimarron Valley, New Mexico, Colorado and Oklahoma. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 38th Field Conference, Northeastern New Mexico38, p. 97-117.

*+Lucas, S. G., & Tanner, L. H. (2007). Tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Triassic-Jurassic transition on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 244(1-4), p. 242-256.

*+Lucas, S. G., Lockley, M. G., Hunt, A. P., & Tanner, L. H. (2006). Biostratigraphic significance of tetrapod footprints from the Triassic-Jurassic Wingate Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau. In J. D. Harris, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, M. G. Lockley, A. R. Milner, & J. I. Kirkland (Eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic terrestrial transition (Vol. 37, pp. 109-117). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

*+Lucas, S. G., Lockley, M. G., Hunt, A. P., & Tanner, L. H. (2006). Tetrapod footprint biostratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic transition in the American southwest. In J. D. Harris, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, M. G. Lockley, A. R. Milner, & J. I. Kirkland (Eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic terrestrial transition (Vol. 37, pp. 105-108). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

*Lucas, S. G., Marzolf, J. E., & Anderson, O. J. (1997). Late Triassic phytosaur skull from SE Utah suggests J-0 unconformity not at base of Wingate Sandstone. Abstracts with Programs. 29, p. 37. Geological Society of America.

*+Lucas, S. G., Tanner, L. H., Heckert, A. B., & Hunt, A. P. (2005). Tetrapod biostratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, Four Corners region, USA. abstracts with Programs. 37, p. 45. Geological Society of America.

*+Martz, J. W., Irmis, R. B., & Milner, A. R. (2014). Lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) in southern Lisbon Valley, southeastern Utah. In Geology of Utah’s far South (Vol. 43, pp. 397-448). Utah Geological Association.

Milner, A. R., & Lockley, M. G. (2016) Dinosaur swim track assemblages: characteristics, contexts, and ichnofacies implications. In Dinosaur Tracks: the next steps. pp. 153-180

*Milner, A. R., Mickelson, D. L., Kirkland, J. I., & Harris, J. D. (2006). A reinvestigation of Late Triassic fish sites in the Chinle Group, San Juan County, Utah: new discoveries. In Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 62 (pp. 163-165). Flagstaff: Museum of Northern Arizona Press.

*+Murry, P. A., & Kirby, R. E. (2002). A new hybodont shark from the Chinle and Bull Canyon Formations, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico. In A. B. Heckert, & S. G. Lucas (Eds.), Upper Triassic Stratigraphy and Paleontology (Vol. 21, pp. 87-106). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

*+Odier, G. P., Lockley, M. G., & Lucas, S. G. (2004). Vertebrate ichnology at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in eastern Utah: new evidence from the Wingate Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 24 (supplement to 3), 99A.

*+Parrish, J. (1999). Small fossil vertebrates from the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) of Southern Utah. Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah, 1(45), 1-6.

*+Parrish, J. M., & Good, S. C. (1987). Preliminary Report on Vertebrate and Invertebrate Fossil Occurrences, Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic), Southeastern Utah. Geology of Cataract Canyon and Vicinity, Tenth Field Conference (pp. 109-116). Four Corners Geological Society.

*Schaeffer, B. (1967). Late Triassic fishes from the western United States. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 135(6), 285-342.

+Smith, J.A., Hunt-Foster, R.K., Gay, R., Conner, C., Miracle, Z., & Foster, J.R. (2016). The novel occurrence of a lintel stone containing vertebrate ichnofossils in a Pueblo III structure in UtahGeological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 48, 7, pp. 147-23. Geological Society of America.
*+Stewart, J. H., G., P. F., Wilson, R. F., Cadigan, R. A., Thordarson, W., & Albee, H. F. (1972). Stratigraphy and origin of the Chinle Formation and related Upper Triassic strata in the Colorado Plateau region. United States Geological Survey.  

Early Jurassic

*+Dorney, L. J. (2009). Carbonate lakes and mounds in the Jurassic Navajo Formation in southeastern Utah. 76. University of Idaho.
*+Dorney, L. J., & Parrish, J. T. (2009). Carbonate mound structures in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southeastern Utah. Abstracts and Programs, Rocky Mountain Section GSA. 41, p. 33. Geological Society of America.
*Eisenberg, L. (2003). Giant stromatolites and a supersurface in the Navajo Sandstone, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. Geology, 31(2), 111-114.
*Ekdale, A. A., & Picard, M. D. (1985). Trace fossils in a Jurassic eolianite, Entrada Sandstone, Utah, USA. Special Publications of SEPM: Biogenic structures: their use in interpreting depositional environments, 3.
*Hasiotis, S. T., Odier, G., Rasmussen, D., & McCormick, T. (2007). Preliminary report on new vertebrate burrow localities in the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, Moab area, southeastern Utah: architectural and surficial burrow morphologies indicative of mammals or therapsids, and social behavior. North-central-South-central Section Meeting (p. 1). Lawrence: Geological Society of America.
*Hunt, A. P., & Lucas, S. G. (2006). The taxonomic status of Navahopus falcipollex and the ichnofauna and inchnofacies of the Navajo lithosome (Lower Jurassic) of western North America. In J. D. Harris, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, M. G. Lockley, A. R. Milner, & J. I. Kirkland (Eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic terrestrial transition (Vol. 37, pp. 164-169). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.
*+Irmis, R. B. (2005). A review of the vertebrate fauna of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone. In R. D. McCord (Ed.), Vertebrate paleontology of Arizona (Vol. 11, pp. 55-71). Mesa: Mesa Southwest Museum.
*+Lockley, M. G., & Hunt, A. P. (1996). Vertebrate track assemblages from the Jurassic Summerville Formation and correlative deposits. In M. Morales (Ed.), The Continental Jurassic: Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 60 (pp. 249-254). Flagstaff: Museum of Northern Arizona.
*Loope, D. B. (1979). Fossil wood and probable root casts in the Navajo Sandstone. Abstracts with Programs. 11, p. 278. Geological Society of America.
*Loope, D. B. (1988). Rhizoliths in ancient eolianites. Sedimentary Geology, 565, 301-314
*Loope, D. B. (2004). Burrows dug by large vertebrates into rain-moistened Middle Jurassic sand dunes. Journal of Geology, 114(6), 753-762.
*+Loope, D. B. (2005). Abundant trace fossils of sand-swimming reptiles preserved in cross-strata deposited high on the flanks of giant Jurassic dunes. Abstract with programs. 37, p. 339. Geological Society of America.
*+Loope, D. B. (2006). Dry-season tracks in dinosaur-triggered grainflows. Palaios, 21(2), 132-142.
*Loope, D. B. (2008). Life beneath the surfaces of active Jurassic dunes: burrows from the Entrada Sandstone of south-central Utah. Palaios, 23(6), 411-419.
*+Loope, D. B., Eisenberg, L., & Waiss, E. (2004). Navajo sand sea of near-equatorial Pangea: tropical westerlies, slumps, and giant stromatolites. In E. P. Nelson, & E. A. Erslev (Eds.), Field trips in the Southern Rocky Mountains (pp. 1-13). Boulder: Geological Society of America.
*+Lucas, S. G., & Tanner, L. H. (2007). Tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Triassic-Jurassic transition on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 244(1-4), 242-256.
*+Lucas, S. G., Gobetz, K. E., Odier, G. P., McCormick, T., & Egan, C. (2006). Tetrapod burrows from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, southeastern Utah. In J. D. Harris, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, M. G. Lockley, A. R. Milner, & J. I. Kirkland (Eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic terrestrial transition (Vol. 37, pp. 147-154). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.
*Lucas, S. G., Lockley, M. G., Hunt, A. P., & Tanner, L. H. (2006). Biostratigraphic significance of tetrapod footprints from the Triassic-Jurassic Wingate Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau. In J. D. Harris, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, M. G. Lockley, A. R. Milner, & J. I. Kirkland (Eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic terrestrial transition (Vol. 37, pp. 109-117). Albuquerque: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.
*Lucas, S. G., Tanner, L. H., Heckert, A. B., & Hunt, A. P. (2005). Tetrapod biostratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, Four Corners region, USA. Abstracts with Programs. 37, p. 45. Geological Society of America.
*+Milan, J., Loope, D. B., & Bromley, R. G. (2008). Crouching theropod and Navajopus sauropodomorph tracks from Early Jurassic Sandstone of USA. Acta Paleontologica Polonica, 53(2), 197-205.
*Odier, G. P., Lockley, M. G., & Lucas, S. G. (2004). Vertebrate ichnology at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in eastern Utah: new evidence from the Wingate Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 24 (supplement to 3), 99A.
*Odier, G., Hasiotis, S. T., Rasmussen, D., & McCormick, T. (2006). Preliminary report on dewatering pipes in the lower part of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah: implications for pluvial episodes and the occurrence of lakes, trees, and mammal burrows. Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, Abstracts and Programs. 38, p. 144. Geological Society of America.
*Parrish, J. T., & Falcon-Lang, H. J. (2007). Coniferous trees associated with interdune deposits in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone Formation, Utah, USA. Palaeontology, 50, 829-843.
*Parrish, J. T., Falcon-Lang, H. J., & Shipman, T. (2002). Carbonate and noncarbonate springs and trees in the eolian Navajo Sandstone, near Tenmile Canyon, SE Utah. Geological Society of America Annual Meeting Programs with Abstracts. 34, p. 507. Geological Society of America.
*Riese, D. J., Hasiotis, S. T., & Odier, G. (2009). Life in a sand sea: burrows excavated by mammals or therapsids in the Navajo Sandstone and their association with other organisms represented by trace fossils in a wet desert ecosystem. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Program. 41, p. 161. Portland: Geological Society of America.
*+Sertich, J. J., & Lowen, M. A. (2010). A new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern UtahPLoS ONE, 5(3), e9789.
*Stokes, W. L. (1978). Animal tracks in the Navajo-Nugget Sandstone. Contributions to Geology, 16(2), 103-107.
*Stokes, W. L. (1983). Silicified trees in the Navajo Sandstone, east-central Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 15, p. 286. Geological Society of America.
*Wilkens, N. D. (2008). Paleoecology of the Early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone interdune deposits. Tempe: Arizona State University.
*Wilkens, N. D., Farmer, J. D., & Pigg, K. B. (2005). Exceptional paleobotanical remains preserved in Navajo Sandstone interdune deposits near Moab, Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 37, pp. 527-528. Geological Society of America.
*Wilkens, N. D., Farmer, J. D., & Pigg, K. B. (2007). Paleoecology of Jurassic Navajo Sandstone interdune environments: an integrated view based on sedimentology, geochemistry, and paleontology. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 39, p. 434. Geological Society of America
*Wilson, M. A., Ozanne, C. R., & Palmer, T. J. (1998). Origin and paleoecology of free-rolling osyter accumulations (ostreoliths) in the Middle Jurassic of southwestern Utah. Palaios, 13(1), 70-78.
*Winkler, D. A., Jacobs, L. L., Congleton, J. D., & Downs, W. R. (1991). Life in a sand sea: biota from Jurassic interdunes. Geology, 19, 889-892.
*Wright, J. C., & Dickey, D. D. (1963). Relations of the Navajo and Carmel Formations in southwest Utah and adjoining Arizona. Geological Survey Research 1962, United States Geological Survey, Reston.
*Zhang, C., Christiansen, E. H., Kowallis, B. J., & Deino, A. L. (1996). Volcanic ashes in the Middle Jurassic of southern Utah. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 28, p. 503. Geological Society of America.

Late Jurassic

*Cope, E. D. (1877). On a dinosaurian from the Trias of Utah. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 16, 579-584.
*Foster, J. (2005). New sauropod dinosaur specimens found near Moab, Utah, and the sauropod fauna of the Morrison Formation. Canyon Legacy, 55, 22-27.
*Foster, J. R., & Lockley, M. G. (1997). Probable crocodilian tracks and traces from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of eastern Utah. Ichnos: An International Journal of Plant & Animal, 5(2), 121-129.
*Jensen, J. A. (1987). New brachiosaur material from the Late Jurassic of Utah and Colorado. Great Basin Naturalist, 47(4), 592-608.
*+Lockley, M. G., & Mayer, C. A. (2000). Therangospodus: trackway evidence for the widespread distribution of a Late Jurassic theropod with well-padded feet. GAIA, 15, 339-353.
*+Lockley, M. G., & Mickleson, D. (1997). Dinosaur and pterosaur tracks in the Summerville and Bluff (Jurassic) beds of eastern Utah and northeastern Arizona. 48th Field Conference. Four Corners Region. New Mexico Geological Society.
*Lockley, M. G., & Santos, V. F. (1998). A new dinosaur tracksite in the Morrison Formation, Boundary Butte, southeastern Utah. Modern Geology, 23(1-4), 317-330.
*Tidwell, W. D. (1990). Preliminary report on the megafossil flora of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. Hunteria, 2(8), 1-11.

Early Cretaceous

Milan, J., Chiappe, L. M., Loope, D. B., Kirkland, J. I., & Lockley, M. G. (2015). First report on dinosaur tracks from the Burro Canyon Formation, San Juan County, Utah, USA - evidence of a diverse, hitherto unknown Lower Cretaceous dinosaur fauna. Annales Geologorum Poloniae, 85, 515-525.

Pleistocene

*Mead, J. I., & Agenbroad, L. D. (n.d.). Isotope dating of Pleistocene dung deposits from the Colorado Plateau, Arizona and Utah. Radiocarbon, 34, 1-19.
*Mead, J. I., Agenbroad, L. D., Martin, P. S., & Davis, O. K. (1984). The mammoth and sloth dung from Bechan Cave in southern Utah. Current Pleistocene Research, 1, 79-80.
*Mead, J. I., Agenbroad, L. D., Middleton, L., & Phillips, A. M. (1987). Extinct Mountain Goat (Oreamnos harringtoni) in southeastern Utah. Quaternary Research, 27, 323-331.
*+Salkin, P. H. (1975). The malacology of the Kane Springs column and the paleoecology of Cedar Mesa, southeastern Utah. Canyonlands Country: 8th Field Symposium (pp. 73-79). Durango: Four Corners Geological Society.

General Geology

*+Bennett, H. S. (1955). Photogeologic map of the Elk Ridge-15 [Hotel Rock] quadrangle, San Juan County, Utah. Salt Lake City: Utah Geological Survey.
*+Sears, J. D. (1956). Geology of Comb Ridge and vicinity north of San Juan River, San Juan County, Utah (Vols. 1021-E). United States Geological Survey.

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